News

TCGA, ISB Researchers Identify Potential Drug Targets for Leading Form of Deadly Liver Cancer

June 19, 2017

Researchers in ISB’s Shmulevich Lab and their colleagues in The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network performed the first large-scale, multi-platform analysis of hepatocellular carcinoma, the predominant form of liver cancer. Study was published on June 15, 2017, in the journal Cell.

3 Bullets:

  • Liver cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer worldwide.
  • ISB researchers and colleagues from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network performed the first large-scale, multi-platform analysis of hepatocellular carcinoma, the predominant form of liver cancer.
  • Such integrated analyses enabled the identification of potential therapeutic targets and facilitated biological insights that would not have been possible otherwise.

READ THE SUMMARY AND PAPER

 

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